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Chris Krenke
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   I was very lucky to acquire one of my dream fans a few months back. Was happy to find that the parts it does have are intact. The armature tested fine and the brush assemblies complete. I just finished building the switch using photos from the site for reference. Now I would like to wind some coils for it. I've done rewinds before and can handle replicating what's in front of me, but from scratch is a different beast. I've tried a few online coil calculators but usually end up more confused than I started. I'm hoping someone could give me some insight on where to begin. Thank you





Steve Cunningham
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CW moved from New York City to Ampere, NJ in 1894.

Steve Cunningham
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I have one in the museum. Maybe you can get Kim to get the wire info off mine.

Chris Krenke
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Thanks Steve, if I can get an ohm reading off one of the coils that would be a huge help. I believe it's 18awg, I had a tiny piece of wire left in the brush connection but I'm not 100% on that.

Kim Frank
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Reach out to Bill Fanum. He helped me rewind this Crocker Wheeler motor to power up a dumbwaiter....

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Chris Krenke
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Will do, thank you Kim

Russ Huber
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Steve Cunningham wrote: CW moved from New York City to Ampere, NJ in 1894.
CW moved from NY to Ampere sometime between April and May of 93.

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Russ Huber
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BTW... the CW concerned burned to the ground with exception of a building used for Japanning in 95.

Chris Krenke
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So would I be safe to say this motor is 93-95? Thank you Russ, for your wealth of information.

Last edited on Thu Feb 18th, 2021 03:38 pm by Chris Krenke

Russ Huber
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Chris Krenke wrote: So would I be safe to say this motor is 93-95? Thank you Russ, for your wealth of information.
As early as 94 spanning into the 20th. I think I am fairly on target? 

Russ Huber
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1898.  1/12th and 1/8th HP bracket fans were in the exhibit.

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Steve Butler
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Chris, your fan is beyond cool. Best of luck with the restoration.  👍👍👍

Jim Kovar
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Hi, Chris.

Since your motor's info plate
states a speed (1800),...

I'm pretty sure your C-W is a
shunt wound motor.



A shunt wound motor will have a
relatively constant speed with a
varying load.

The speed of a series wound motor

will change with a varying load.




Chris Krenke
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Thank you everyone for your compliments and information. 

Last edited on Thu Feb 18th, 2021 10:08 pm by Chris Krenke

Chris Krenke
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I believe these were courtesy of Russ on a previous post



Chris Krenke
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https://afcaforum.com/forum1/15526.html

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Jim Kovar
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Chris, I think your motor's field coils can
be switched to either series or parallel.

The field coils, either in series or parallel,
are in parallel with the armature, thus
you have a shunt motor.

Don Tener
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I know this is not a big deal but isn't the switch on the wrong side of the motor? It can easily be moved to the other side by just moving/switching the cast iron coil bars. Or did they put the switch on ether side. This is the first one I saw like this?

Last edited on Fri Feb 19th, 2021 03:32 am by Don Tener

Chris Krenke
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Jim, thank you for explanation. I've still got a lot to learn on the electrical side. Don, I believe you are correct about the switch. Every photo/catalog I've seen the switch was on the other side. This will be fixed when I break it down for the rewind as will the tag orientation. Thank you all

Kim Frank
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Here's the C-W after the rewind and Bill figuring out the hook up for the field coils...

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Kim Frank
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And all dressed out.....

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Kim Frank
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Bill figured this thing out in about 15 minutes and had it running like a new motor...

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Kim Frank
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It's now ready to power the Dumbwaiter, once everything else is finished, painted, or polished

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Chris Krenke
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That's a beautiful restoration as always Kim. I really enjoy these old bipolar motors, something about all the exposed terminals. Didn't live long being careless back then. I plan on doing a similar rewind on the coils. Modern magnet wire with a cotton rope covering. I sourced some double cotton covered 18 awg but just doesn't look the same as they came originally. Original almost looks rope covered.

Kim Frank
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I restored that motor back in 2010. One coil had an open that I was able to find and fix, but the wire was sketchy. The motor ran but didn't have a lot of torque, plus I put the wiring hookup back as it was and it never seemed right. Bill Fanum came down for the Sept. Museum meet and figured the thing out in no time. He had me wind both coils with 28 ga magnet wire and then he started hooking everything up. He had it going in no time at all. He is a genius with these motors.

Last edited on Sat Feb 20th, 2021 02:06 pm by Kim Frank

Don Tener
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Chris Krenke wrote: That's a beautiful restoration as always Kim. I really enjoy these old bipolar motors, something about all the exposed terminals. Didn't live long being careless back then. I plan on doing a similar rewind on the coils. Modern magnet wire with a cotton rope covering. I sourced some double cotton covered 18 awg but just doesn't look the same as they came originally. Original almost looks rope covered.I just sent you a PM about this. Kim just answered the question I was wondering about. He used 28awg. What looks like rope is rope, no wire in it, It is just a protective covering. I think you are going to need smaller AWG wire. If 23awg will work I have a LOT of it and would be happy to ship you some.

Don Tener
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I also have quite a bit of 30 and 34 awg. So if we can find out exactly what they used on these I may have what you need

Chris Krenke
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It's 28awg. Thanks Kim. It'll take 827 feet to get the 54 ohms of a known good coil. Thanks Don. I have my starting point. 

Kim Frank
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I thought the same thing about the ohms and figured I only needed around 1760 feet of magnet wire for the same reading. It didn't produce much of a magnetic field. When Bill came to the shop, he had me splice onto what was already on the coil and fill it up with wire. Ohms are somewhere around 280 per coil now and the motor is strong running. Give Bill a call is my advice for what to do on these old motors.

Chris Krenke
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Thanks for the heads up Kim. I've learned over the course of this, that the turns are just as important if not more then the ohm readings. More turns=more magnetism. After enough math to make my head hurt, I learned 28awg is the best starting point. It would take a pound of 26awg to get the 54ohms. Too much to fit on the coil. It should only take .4 pounds of the 28awg. I can fit that with room to add as I see fit. I did try to PM Bill a few days ago, I will phone him. Thanks for all the help, I feel like I have a much better understanding and a good starting point after all this.


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