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 Posted: Sat May 22nd, 2021 09:42 am
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Brad Vander Waal
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I can't seem to find any info on this fan. My mom bought it for me and I'm finally getting around to doing a little work on it. Any background on the Super Air company would be greatly appreciated

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 Posted: Sat May 22nd, 2021 08:04 pm
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Mike Kearns
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As early as 1946 and as late as 1950: Super Air was a line of desk fans made by Superior Electric Products Incorporated, manufacturing deco-styled hot plates, percolators, toasters, grills, waffle irons and desk fans for the low to medium price market. Super Air was marketed as a sideline model of the Super-Lectric product line. The company was founded in 1922 and incorporated in 1923 in St. Louis, Missouri. The factory was in Cape Girardeau, Missouri. 





Last edited on Sun May 23rd, 2021 02:55 am by Mike Kearns

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 Posted: Sun May 23rd, 2021 05:37 am
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Brad Vander Waal
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Thank you so much! Any idea on the value? It runs well I'm just doing a basic cleaning on it

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 Posted: Sun May 23rd, 2021 08:12 pm
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Mike Kearns
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It didn't go up so much since new, as there were a lot of them made, cheaply. $20.00 to 25.00 retail, maybe a little less, maybe a little more, depending on how much the buyer really likes it. I think it's a good looking design that goes well with the other fans that will follow :D. Fan collecting is addictive!

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 Posted: Mon May 24th, 2021 01:48 am
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Levi Mevis
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Mike Kearns wrote: It didn't go up so much since new, as there were a lot of them made, cheaply. $20.00 to 25.00 retail, maybe a little less, maybe a little more, depending on how much the buyer really likes it. I think it's a good looking design that goes well with the other fans that will follow :D. Fan collecting is addictive!
Hi Mike, did the Superior Electric that made the fans have any relation to the Superior Electric that made the Powerstat Variacs?

Just wondering because they both have the same name for the company but different locations, the Superior Electric that made the Variacs was Based out of Bristol, Connecticut, and the Superior Electric that made the fans was based out of St. Louis, Missouri, any sort of corporate ties like possibly different divisions (plant locations) like how GE had different manufacturing plants across the country that specialized in different electrical devices?

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 Posted: Mon May 24th, 2021 04:17 am
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Mike Kearns
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No relation: The CompanyThis section of http://www.wimb.net gives an historical overview of the company Superior Electric and its products, like Slo-Syn stepper motors and motion controls. I was always interested in technical history, and, since I worked a very long time for Superior Electric, I do have an interesting collection of old Slo-Syn stuff.
Superior ElectricSuperior Electric is located in Bristol Ct. The company was founded in 1938 by Mr. Alfred B. Nelson and Thor L. Hannon.
The first product was the POWERSTAT variable transformer. This product was expanded into a complete line of voltage control equipment which provided the first step in the company's growth. POWERSTAT variable transformers are widely used to control voltage in industrial, military, laboratory and communications areas.
Another voltage control product, the STABILINE automatic voltage regulator, was developed to maintain constant voltage required for television broadcasting, main frame computer operation and other applications.
The LUXTROL line of lighting controls was designed and introduced for use in public and industrial buildings, school, theatres, broadcasting facilities and private homes.
Superior Electric's SLO-SYN synchronous and stepping motors were developed in early 1958 for use with the company's voltage control equipment. SLO-SYN synchronous motors run "in step" with the electrical current. The SLO-SYN motor is, as its name implies, is designed for slow speed synchronous rotation.

With conventional 60 cycle current, SLO-SYN motors rotate at exactly seventy-two revolutions per minute, connected to 50 cycle power, they rotate with 60 revolutions per minute. This is all done without any gearing.
As a stepping motor, it advances a precise angle of 1.8 degrees (1/200 of a revolution) without error accumulation for each pulse of power that is supplied. This rotational motion combined with a five-pitch lead screw on a machine tool produces a table movement of exactly one thousandth of an inch for each pulse of power.
POWERSTAT®Most recognized trademark in the technology, POWERSTAT® Variable Transformers offer 31 series in either single or three phase 120, 240 or 480 V types in ratings from 0.13 to 365 kVA. Manual and motor driven, open and enclosed, portable with and without meters. Epoxy-coated POWERKOTE® Coils give 20% average higher current ratings, greater overload capacity.

Synchronous MotorsTo turn these Powerstats they started to make synchronous motors. These motors are driven by single phase 115 or 230 vac. They need a phase shift network consisting of a capacitor and a resistor. In principle these motors runs on two phases, with a 90-degree phase shift. The brand name of these motors is Slo-Syn

Motion ControlsAfter the synchronous motors it was found that just with other windings these synchronous motors could be converted to "Stepper Motors". Also these stepper motors runs on two phases, with a 90-degree phase shift. The brand name of these motors and drives is also Slo-Syn
The first drive was the STM250, later followed by the long time very popular STM1800 series. The STM1800CV was equipped with an oscillator made with a Unijunction transistor, 2N1671B from General Electric. The power section was made with four of the also very famous Delco Germanium transistors, Superior Electrics part number: BM144640a

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 Posted: Mon May 24th, 2021 04:48 am
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Levi Mevis
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Mike Kearns wrote: No relation: The CompanyThis section of http://www.wimb.net gives an historical overview of the company Superior Electric and its products, like Slo-Syn stepper motors and motion controls. I was always interested in technical history, and, since I worked a very long time for Superior Electric, I do have an interesting collection of old Slo-Syn stuff.
Superior ElectricSuperior Electric is located in Bristol Ct. The company was founded in 1938 by Mr. Alfred B. Nelson and Thor L. Hannon.
The first product was the POWERSTAT variable transformer. This product was expanded into a complete line of voltage control equipment which provided the first step in the company's growth. POWERSTAT variable transformers are widely used to control voltage in industrial, military, laboratory and communications areas.
Another voltage control product, the STABILINE automatic voltage regulator, was developed to maintain constant voltage required for television broadcasting, main frame computer operation and other applications.
The LUXTROL line of lighting controls was designed and introduced for use in public and industrial buildings, school, theatres, broadcasting facilities and private homes.
Superior Electric's SLO-SYN synchronous and stepping motors were developed in early 1958 for use with the company's voltage control equipment. SLO-SYN synchronous motors run "in step" with the electrical current. The SLO-SYN motor is, as its name implies, is designed for slow speed synchronous rotation.

With conventional 60 cycle current, SLO-SYN motors rotate at exactly seventy-two revolutions per minute, connected to 50 cycle power, they rotate with 60 revolutions per minute. This is all done without any gearing.
As a stepping motor, it advances a precise angle of 1.8 degrees (1/200 of a revolution) without error accumulation for each pulse of power that is supplied. This rotational motion combined with a five-pitch lead screw on a machine tool produces a table movement of exactly one thousandth of an inch for each pulse of power.
POWERSTAT®Most recognized trademark in the technology, POWERSTAT® Variable Transformers offer 31 series in either single or three phase 120, 240 or 480 V types in ratings from 0.13 to 365 kVA. Manual and motor driven, open and enclosed, portable with and without meters. Epoxy-coated POWERKOTE® Coils give 20% average higher current ratings, greater overload capacity.

Synchronous MotorsTo turn these Powerstats they started to make synchronous motors. These motors are driven by single phase 115 or 230 vac. They need a phase shift network consisting of a capacitor and a resistor. In principle these motors runs on two phases, with a 90-degree phase shift. The brand name of these motors is Slo-Syn

Motion ControlsAfter the synchronous motors it was found that just with other windings these synchronous motors could be converted to "Stepper Motors". Also these stepper motors runs on two phases, with a 90-degree phase shift. The brand name of these motors and drives is also Slo-Syn
The first drive was the STM250, later followed by the long time very popular STM1800 series. The STM1800CV was equipped with an oscillator made with a Unijunction transistor, 2N1671B from General Electric. The power section was made with four of the also very famous Delco Germanium transistors, Superior Electrics part number: BM144640a

Ok, interesting, I wonder how the Superior Electric of St. Louis the maker of Fans and other home appliances didn't have any copyright infringement lawsuits filed against them by Superior Electric of Bristol, Conn.? 

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 Posted: Mon May 24th, 2021 05:47 am
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Mike Kearns
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Any further questions, I'm going to have to charge you for, Levi  :D : https://www.uspto.gov/page/about-trademark-infringement

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 Posted: Mon May 24th, 2021 05:54 am
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Levi Mevis
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Mike Kearns wrote: Any further questions, I'm going to have to charge you for, Levi  :D : https://www.uspto.gov/page/about-trademark-infringement
That really didn't answer my question, how was it possible for 2 different companies with the same name to co-exist without some sort of trademark infringement problems? I guess I can also say the same about Emerson, the fan and motor manufacturer and Emerson the radio manufacturer too technically... :wondering:

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