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12" Hunter R & M Exhaust Fan  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Fri Aug 20th, 2021 09:28 pm
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Vic Valencheck
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I don't pickup exhaust fans but a buddy of mine gave it to me. Just couldn't turn  it down. Haha It has an aluminum blade. Runs smooth and quiet in both speeds. Don't know what the deal is with the wire looped around the motor bracket. It could have been mounted in a chicken coop. There was a chicken feather stuck to the fan blade. Haha









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 Posted: Wed Aug 25th, 2021 09:21 pm
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Levi Mevis
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Your fan was made no earlier than 1946 because that's when R & M bought out Hunter and moved them down to Memphis. 
As for the wire around the mounting brackets, that was supposed to be a form of "safety grille" to keep stuff from getting into the fan blades.

The fact that there is chicken wire over the blade side of the fan is a dead giveaway that this fan was most certainly used in a chicken coop for ventilating purposes (and also the fact that you found a chicken feather in the blades).

I really don't know much else about this fan other than its a reversable two speed fan, and its more than likely a PSC motor on that fan given that it has such low current draw (0.8 amps).

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 Posted: Wed Aug 25th, 2021 11:00 pm
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Vic Valencheck
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Levi Mevis wrote: Your fan was made no earlier than 1946 because that's when R & M bought out Hunter and moved them down to Memphis. 
As for the wire around the mounting brackets, that was supposed to be a form of "safety grille" to keep stuff from getting into the fan blades.

The fact that there is chicken wire over the blade side of the fan is a dead giveaway that this fan was most certainly used in a chicken coop for ventilating purposes (and also the fact that you found a chicken feather in the blades).

I really don't know much else about this fan other than its a reversable two speed fan, and its more than likely a PSC motor on that fan given that it has such low current draw (0.8 amps).
I didn't realize that it was reverseable. Thanks 

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 Posted: Thu Aug 26th, 2021 08:07 am
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Levi Mevis
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Vic Valencheck wrote: Levi Mevis wrote: Your fan was made no earlier than 1946 because that's when R & M bought out Hunter and moved them down to Memphis. 
As for the wire around the mounting brackets, that was supposed to be a form of "safety grille" to keep stuff from getting into the fan blades.

The fact that there is chicken wire over the blade side of the fan is a dead giveaway that this fan was most certainly used in a chicken coop for ventilating purposes (and also the fact that you found a chicken feather in the blades).

I really don't know much else about this fan other than its a reversable two speed fan, and its more than likely a PSC motor on that fan given that it has such low current draw (0.8 amps).
I didn't realize that it was reverseable. Thanks 
The reason why I say its reversable is because you have 2 switches on the fan, presumably one is the power switch, (Hi, Off, Low) and the other is the reversing switch (forward, reverse).


At least that's what it looks like to me, it would seem odd to have 2 switches for powering the fan.

Last edited on Thu Aug 26th, 2021 08:07 am by Levi Mevis

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 Posted: Thu Aug 26th, 2021 01:05 pm
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Tom Zapf
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I TOO NOTICED 2 SWITCHES ... AND FIGURED IT WAS REVERSIBLE AS WELL 

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 Posted: Thu Aug 26th, 2021 01:24 pm
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Steve Rockwell
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   I want to refine or clarify a minor point here. Levi's statement about 1946 or after would be absolutely correct...
Your fan was made no earlier than 1946 because that's when R & M bought out Hunter and moved them down to Memphis. 
   However, Hunter Fan and Motor Co. was present in Memphis fully twenty years prior to that, and in 1937 they combined with the Fan Department of Century Electric to become the Hunter Fan and Ventilation Company. By 1946 Robbins & Myers subsumed them, and in that year the last facility in Fulton NY was sold, equipment moved to Memphis, and R & M management replaced the higher-ups in Memphis with the single exception (that I've found) of the Treasurer...

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 Posted: Thu Aug 26th, 2021 03:54 pm
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Levi Mevis
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Steve Rockwell wrote:    I want to refine or clarify a minor point here. Levi's statement about 1946 or after would be absolutely correct...
Your fan was made no earlier than 1946 because that's when R & M bought out Hunter and moved them down to Memphis. 
   However, Hunter Fan and Motor Co. was present in Memphis fully twenty years prior to that, and in 1937 they combined with the Fan Department of Century Electric to become the Hunter Fan and Ventilation Company. By 1946 Robbins & Myers subsumed them, and in that year the last facility in Fulton NY was sold, equipment moved to Memphis, and R & M management replaced the higher-ups in Memphis with the single exception (that I've found) of the Treasurer...

OK well I didn't realize that Hunter moved to Memphis after acquiring Century, because I know most of the old Hunter Century fans (later Zephairs) had Fulton, NY on their Data Tags yet up until 1946 or so (when the Hunter Century fans became the Hunter Zephair fans, and when R & M took over operations at Hunter) which is what confused me regarding that info. 

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 Posted: Thu Aug 26th, 2021 07:54 pm
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Vic Valencheck
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I took the cover off and there was a diagram on the back of it. Evidently someone had added a on/off power switch. If I would have done it I'd install a 3 position toggle switch I don't see anything that would reverse the motor.




 

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 Posted: Fri Aug 27th, 2021 02:21 pm
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Michael Mirin
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The exhaust fan appears to be from the early to mid 50s.

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 Posted: Fri Aug 27th, 2021 07:09 pm
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John McComas
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A center off toggle switch should be used as per the schematic. If you turn both switches on, (high switch and low switch) you can burn out the motor.
You never want to apply power to BOTH the high winding, AND
the low winding at the same time. It is NOT like a floor lamp that you can ADD and turn on multiple lamps. The high and low motor windings fight each other when both are energized. You can TEST this out by measuring power when Hi and low are both connected.
Happy Fanning

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 Posted: Sat Aug 28th, 2021 03:59 pm
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Vic Valencheck
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John McComas wrote: A center off toggle switch should be used as per the schematic. If you turn both switches on, (high switch and low switch) you can burn out the motor.
You never want to apply power to BOTH the high winding, AND
the low winding at the same time. It is NOT like a floor lamp that you can ADD and turn on multiple lamps. The high and low motor windings fight each other when both are energized. You can TEST this out by measuring power when Hi and low are both connected.
Happy Fanning
Yes I understand that but the switch they used flips high to low. The other switch is a on/ off power  switch. I know if that speed switch is shorted out it would burn out the motor. It is a bad rewiring  job.

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 Posted: Sat Aug 28th, 2021 08:54 pm
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John McComas
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Vic Valencheck wrote: John McComas wrote: A center off toggle switch should be used as per the schematic. If you turn both switches on, (high switch and low switch) you can burn out the motor.
You never want to apply power to BOTH the high winding, AND
the low winding at the same time. It is NOT like a floor lamp that you can ADD and turn on multiple lamps. The high and low motor windings fight each other when both are energized. You can TEST this out by measuring power when Hi and low are both connected.
Happy FanningYes I understand that but the switch they used flips high to low. The other switch is a on/ off power  switch. I know if that speed switch is shorted out it would burn out the motor. It is a bad rewiring  job.That works.  I was assuming they had used SPST switches.  :wondering: I could not tell from the crowded picture of the switches how it is wired now. :wondering:  I was making assumptions going mostly from the schematic drawing. :shock:
Sounds like you got it covered. :D

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 Posted: Sat Sep 4th, 2021 06:20 pm
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David Northam
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Here is my Hunter R&M exhaust fan. This one is 18-inches and the blade set seems to be exactly like the very popular 18-inch Hunter window fans. Mine is finished in the same mint-green as yours. This was a purchase from Jason Neill at the Lehigh Valley meet probably 7 years ago. I've been using it as an exhaust fan in my garage for years. Mine does not have the switch, but I do have the switch plate.

Attached Image (viewed 75 times):

R&M Hunter exhaust fan.jpg

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 Posted: Sat Sep 4th, 2021 06:22 pm
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David Northam
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The switch plate

Attached Image (viewed 75 times):

R&M Hunter exhaust switch plate.jpg

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 Posted: Sat Sep 4th, 2021 06:25 pm
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Vic Valencheck
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David Northam wrote: Here is my Hunter R&M exhaust fan. This one is 18-inches and the blade set seems to be exactly like the very popular 18-inch Hunter window fans. Mine is finished in the same mint-green as yours. This was a purchase from Jason Neill at the Lehigh Valley meet probably 7 years ago. I've been using it as an exhaust fan in my garage for years. Mine does not have the switch, but I do have the switch plate.
Looks like your putting that fan to good use. :up:

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